Carnivals

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Tonti flew into the room in Molly's mask.

- What is this ?! - Molly was indignant.

- Come on soon! We have a carnival today! Tonti said cheerfully.

- I'm sorry, what?

- Get ready and listen. This is a very interesting holiday! They came up with it awfully long ago, even in Ancient Rome. Slaves and gentlemen changed places there: the hosts offered wine to their servants, and they behaved as they pleased. They say that the word "carnival" translates as "farewell to the meat." Such grandiose holidays are usually arranged just before Lent. But in Venice everyone loved carnival masks so much that they began to wear them even on ordinary days.

In Russia, carnivals appeared under Peter the Great.

They lasted all night: with dances, jokes, fireworks and unmasking in the morning. The drums beat loudly, the bells rang. Different animals were made to scream. The noise was unimaginable! And at the daughter of Peter the Great, Empress Elizabeth Petrovna, at the holidays, a trick was instituted. Men dressed as women and women as men. In winter, the Empress held carnivals in a huge ice house. Everything was made of ice-trees, birds, tables, chairs and even elephants. The kids also had their own masquerades - with costumes and fun until the morning. But the most ambitious carnivals in Russia were held in honor of military victories. As many as three thousand people attended one of these holidays!

Well, 150 neighbors and all fifth grades from school will come to our carnival. So in your place, Molly, I would hurry. It's time to choose a costume.